Notes From The Cellar

Bacioni-Braised Short Ribs

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Cooking with Linganore Wines: Bacioni-Braised Short Ribs

By: Matthew Lorman

 

The winter weather is upon us, and what better way to warm up than with a plate of our hearty Bacioni-Braised Short Ribs. Serve these alongside roasted garlic mashed potatoes or creamy Parmesan polenta for a meal that is sure to impress the whole family!

 

Ingredients:

  • 5 pounds bone-in beef short ribs, cut into 2” pieces
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper for seasoning
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 large onions, peeled and chopped
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 bottle of Linganore Bacioni (Chambourcin works well too!)
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 4 sprigs of rosemary
  • 8 sprigs of thyme
  • 4 cups of low sodium beef stock

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Season the short ribs with salt and pepper, then sear them over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven. After they are browned on all sides, transfer the short ribs to a plate.
  2. Add the onions, carrots, and celery to the Dutch oven with and cook over medium heat, until the onions start to brown. Add the flour and tomato paste and continue to cook, stirring constantly, until the tomato paste turns deep red.
  3. Stir in the bottle of Linganore Bacioni and add the short ribs. Bring the wine to a boil, and reduce to the heat to medium. Simmer until the wine is reduces by half (this will take about twenty minutes).
  4. Add all the herbs and stir in the stock to the pot. Bring the stock to a boil, cover the Dutch oven with a lid, and transfer to the oven.
  5. Braise the short ribs until tender, which will take about 2 ½ hours. When they are done, serve overtop of roasted garlic mashed potatoes or creamy Parmesan polenta and enjoy.

Red Wine Chocolate Fudge Brownies

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Cooking with Linganore Wines: Red Wine Chocolate Fudge Brownies

By: Matthew Lorman

 

The question of what to do with that last little bit of wine in the bottle always puzzles me (mostly because wine doesn’t last long at a party with good friends). An open bottle of wine never tastes as good the next day as it does the day it’s opened. So what do you do with it? Do you save it? My response is always to cook with it! Add wine to certain recipes can create a remarkable flavor experience that few other ingredients can achieve. Many people are familiar with adding wine to a sauce, or stew, but how about brownies? Rich cherry and raspberry overtones in red wine can translate beautifully into a nice, chewy brownie. I recommend serving these brownies while they are still warm with a scoop of vanilla gelato, and a glass of Linganore Steeplechase.

 

Ingredients:

  • 4 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
  • ½ cup butter, cut into pieces
  • ¼ Linganore Steeplechase Red (or any Linganore fruit wine such as raspberry or strawberry)
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • ½ cup all purpose flour
  • ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup chocolate chips

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter an 8×8 pan and set aside
  2. Melt the chocolate and butter together in the microwave, stirring occasionally until melted
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, sugars, and vanilla. Whisk in the chocolate mixture, and then the wine. Add the flour, cocoa powder, and salt and stir until the batter is smooth. Fold in the chocolate chips being careful to not over mix.
  4. Pour the batter into the buttered baking dish, and bake for 15-20 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center of the brownies comes out clean.
  5. Let the brownies cool slightly before cutting and enjoying with a glass of Linganore Steeplechase Red!

An Aellen History Lesson

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Happy Day to everyone!

So today we are taking a walk into history.  I’d like to tell you a little bit about our family.  Specifically, our dad’s side of the family.  All of our grandparents are from Europe, and so there is a rich history – including wine and, yes, it goes without saying – food too.

In the tasting room, there is a “Coat of Arms” hanging in the hallway that goes from the steps to the Abisso Hall into the Tasting room.  This is the “Aellen Family Crest”.  Yes – our last name is Aellen – and for almost everyone living in the USA, it is correctly misspelled.  A really long time ago, Anthony painted our family crest on one of the silos.  It is still there today, just a little faded (he did a really good job – freehand!)

Linganore Winecellars and our History

Our family crest originated in Saanen, Switzerland, in the mid 1300′s, which is where my Grandfather was born.  This crest hangs in the town hall of Saanen and is in a stained glass window in the St. Nicholas Chapel in Gstaad in the Bernese Alps of Switzerland.  This fact is funny and coincidental, as you’ll remember from a previous blog that my dad was born on Christmas day (ergo, St. Nicholas).  The crest appears warlike – a sword and three helmets representing distinction in battle, and two discs/coins – called “Plappert”, given to warriors as a military wage.

Crest

For a long time the Aellens were in the service of the Counts of Gruyeres.  When the wars in Burgundy were over (forget your history? – you can look it up on wikipedia), and in honor and esteem for their service, in which they excelled themselves with bravery (that’s what the written history from my family says – I’m not making this stuff up), the “servicemen” of the Count of Bern, Switzerland (of which Gruyere, Saanen and Basel were a part of) were freed from further service, giving each family a freedom pass and a family crest.  Centuries before this, our name might have originated from Ella or Elle but then became Aell, which meant “tall” or “strong”.  So – that’s how we got our name correctly misspelled (just in case you were wondering).

Our family crest was on our labels probably about 20 years ago.  But then modernization took over and it was decided that the look needed to be more, um, updated.  So, now we have a different design…

One of the very first wines we ever made was a dry apple wine (or apfelwein) – which is a German or Swiss style of wine, not typically produced here in the US.  Currently, we sell the Spiced Apple Wine, which is slightly sweet and spiced with cinnamon and cloves.  We like recommending this wine during the fall/winter months, served warmed.

So that’s it with the history lesson!  In our next history lesson (that doesn’t include a war or a crest, but does include a press – wine press, that is!), I’ll add some about our Sicilian Italian heritage and how it started the winery…that part is a hoot!

Until next time, please do try to enjoy your day, and do something nice for someone.  Even if you don’t want to :)   You’ll be happy you did, and then you’ll really enjoy your day!

- p

 

 

 


Out With The Old and In With…A New Vineyard??

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Good Afternoon! 

We hope everyone is having a good day today – knowing there are some of you who are just getting back in the swing of things, having been off for the holiday break…maybe even wishing you had another day off…while some of you are just happy to be back at work(!)

Today we are talking with Eric about the vineyards.  We seem to have less of them, and perhaps I am not here often enough, but I think one of our vineyards got eaten up overnight by a really big groundhog (and their family too – must be Italian).

Anyway, part of the front vineyard has been replaced.  As you come up the lane (that’s what we call our really long driveway –I’ll have to talk with the management about naming it!), the vineyard on the right side of the lane is now a big plot of tilled soil.  It has been “subsoiled” and tilled – I’ve included a picture below.  Eric uses subsoiling to break up any hard layers of soil to allow the roots of the new vines an easier time to grow and easy entry of water into the soil for those roots.  He then follow with tilling which turns the earth over.  The new vineyard, which will be replanted in the varietal Chambourcin, will be going in sometime this spring.  There is a lot of prep work that goes into making a vineyard, which includes preparing the soil, putting in the posts and anchor posts, and stringing the trellis.  The grapevines come to us looking like a short stick with a little bulb of roots.  The first grapes from this vineyard will be harvested in the fall of 2017.

If you ever come up to the winery and want to get a view of all of the vineyards, you’ll have to walk to the top of the hill that sits adjacent to the big barn that the tasting room is located in.  We have a total of five separate vineyards (depending on what you call separate) with a total of fifteen different varieties of grapes planted on seventy acres.

I am very saddened to report that the fifty million grapes (seemingly no exaggeration) that my brothers and I planted are no longer in existence (#sadsob).  However, the good news is that the grapes that are currently planted make better tasting wine (#smileyface).

On most days, in the tasting room, we have four dry (not sweet) white and five red dry grape wines to taste, eleven different types of semi-sweet grapes wines and nine varieties of semi-sweet fruit/honey wines.

Well, that’s it for now – please enjoy your day, smile and have fun.

-pinky

New Cham Vineyard 2015


A Tribute to our Dad & Founder of Linganore Winecellars

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Merry Christmas from our family to yours!

We hope today that you are enjoying some time with family and friends, and that you are sipping some of your favorite wine too, as you celebrate the holiday.  It is our hope for you that today is a day of peace, love, hope and joy.

Today we also remember my dad – today would have been his birthday – yep – he was a Christmas baby!  (I’ll spare the jokes).  My dad – John Aellen, is the founder of the winery, along with his wife, my mom, Lucille. Way back in 1971 he had an idea (and dragged my mom along the way – willingly, I might add) to purchase a farm.  Did I mention that the both of them were from Brooklyn, NY?  They did not purchase just any farm, or farmette, but a 230 acre farm in completely and absolutely the middle of nowhere (really).  Then – just to add to the fun – they decided to add some animals, and pretty soon, we had a zoo. (oh, woops – it only seemed like a zoo).  Oh, and I forgot to add we had a working farm – hay, crops, cattle, sheep, pigs, goats, (sadly, only one horse), chickens, and all the rest.   THEN, to add to everything, they decided to start a winery in 1974 and by 1976, we had our winery license and were operational.  Sounds kind of funny, huh?

Add to this the fact that my dad was totally blind from age 28, which is even more of an inspiration, when you think that in spite of this incredible handicap, he was able to accomplish all he did.  And he also worked full time in Gaithersburg and Washington, DC.  But he also had an incredible woman helping him – my mom, and a supportive family.

Well, here we are almost 40 years later, and now look dad!  So, here’s a tribute to you, for your tireless work, and your dreams.  To you who taught me to sing songs during the long, very boring hours working in the fields (making it incredibly enjoyable and fun) – taking “yard work” to a whole new level, crushing grapes until the wee hours of the morning, using a wheelbarrow to teach us right from left (or was that left from right?) and so many other precious things that don’t make a bit of difference to anyone.  But they are all good memories, filled with love, which connects the two of us, and lasts all the way, without fail, into eternity.

So, here’s to you dad – Merry Christmas and Happy Birthday to the most remarkable man I have ever met.

Your loving, devoted daughter – and the rest of us too… – p